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Tigers Short Hops: Game 2

Tigers Short Hops: Game 2

DETROIT -- Fielding the Tigers' World Series Game 2 victory over the Cardinals on a short hop ...

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In < 25 words ...
Kenny Rogers continued his October mastery with another scoreless performance to get the Tigers out of town with a much-needed split.

Frozen moment
With the wind chill pushing temperatures into the low 30s, there were plenty of candidates, but the one frozen moment that stands out had to be Craig Monroe right after the ball left the Tigers left fielder's bat in the first inning. Monroe drove Jeff Weaver's first pitch 421 feet into the left-field seats to give the Tigers the lead for good and it put a charge into the crowd and quickly let everyone know that the Game 1 loss was indeed behind the Tigers.

Big number
(0-for-)19 -- Pudge Rodriguez in the postseason, counting his 0-for-4 Sunday night.

Game ball
Magglio Ordonez went 2-for-3, scored a run and helped set the stage for Carlos Guillen.

Sense of October
The intensity and emotion of Rogers and Monroe. The smell of hot brats and hot chocolate on a frigid night in Michigan. Even if you didn't take time on the way to the ballpark to notice the autumn color at its peak, October reminders were everywhere at Comerica Park.

Lines of the Game
Hitting

Carlos Guillen
4 AB, 3 H, 2B, 3B, BB, R, RBI
Comment: Guillen reached each time he came to the plate, came within a home run of the cycle and accounted for two of Detroit's three runs.

Pitching
Kenny Rogers
8 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 3 BB, 5 K
Comment: Rogers' remarkable autumn run showed no signs of slowing as he ran his string of consecutive scoreless innings to 23.

Quotable
"
I think everybody should be amazed. You're witnessing one of the greatest postseason performances by an individual in the history of baseball." -- Detroit pitcher Nate Robertson, on teammate Rogers

Next step
It's on to St. Louis for the first World Series game at the new Busch Stadium. Nate Robertson gets the call against Cardinals ace Chris Carpenter.

Jim Molony is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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